Maunga not mountain

Living in the Coromandel Coast town of Tairua we had an amazing view of the harbour and on to Mount Paaku. Having jumped across New Zealand to the west coast our view is so very similar, but now we get to admire the sunset surrounding Mount Karioi every night.

 

When we found our slice of paradise in Tairua we really thought that we would be in that house forever, but as it turned out we were nearly there. We were just on the wrong coast. Blessed with a husband who is a keen surfer, our place of residence was always influenced by the call of the sea. We have spent years calling Muriwai Beach and Gisborne home, but now we feel that Raglan is our final destination (maybe). And as it turns out many others end their journey, searching for the perfect place, here in Raglan. After all the Maori name Whāingaroa means ‘the long pursuit’, which refers to the lengthy search of the Tainui waka ‘canoe’ for a final destination.

Most commonly known as a thoroughfare to the rest of the Coromandel, Tairua which means ‘two tides’ also hosts an awesome surf break when the swells right. Tairua should be known more for its Polynesian fishing lure, which was found during an  archaeological excavation in 1964. The lure is made from a black lipped pearl shell Pinctada margaritifera which is not native to New Zealand. The lure is highly significant because it was made in East Polynesia and brought here, on a waka, with the Polynesian settlers of Aotearoa. It now lives at the Auckland Museum.

 

I always find it interesting that many people call themselves locals of a particular place and yet they know nothing of its history. The double cone volcanic peak that dominates the landscape of Tairua and neighbouring Pauanui ‘large abalone’ is known as Mt Paku, when we should actually be referring to it as Maunga Paku. And paku, which means ‘particle, dried, little and small’ should be pronounced Pakū indicating a long vowel, giving a more fitting meaning for a volcano, of ‘ to make a sudden sound’. Pāku as it’s commonly referred to isn’t even in Maori dictionaries. I was told that it was originally named Paaku which is the Maori name of the fairy’s that lived on the mountain.

In the glorious town of Raglan Whāingaroa Maunga Karioi is a 2.4 million year old extinct volcano, the earliest of a line of 6 calcalkalic volcanoes. The profile of Karioi from Raglan is likened to a ‘Sleeping Lady’ Wahine Moe. Karioi which means ‘to loiter or idle’ could humourously depict the laid back nature of the surfing culture which is evident.

The nearby township of Te Uku is where our children attend school. As if preparing you for your entry into Whāingaroa, Te Uku Roast Office is located beside the school, offering Raglan Roast daily ground coffee! I’d love to learn more about Te Uku and the white clay that it is named after. It would be amazing to use a locally source material in my sculptural work.

Living in Raglan we are surrounded by like-minded people, valuing a laid back lifestyle and appreciating nature. There is a strong awareness and appreciation of the environment and many inhabitants are willing to make a difference.

hari ahau i

 

 

Destined for plant life

By now you should have all googled the meaning of your name, and the names of people in your life. It’s a fun way to see just how prophetic your name is.

‘Laura’, is derived from the Bay Laurel Tree which was commonly used in making wreaths, representing victory and honor.

laurel

I love that my name’s origin is a plant, and a very aromatic one at that. The Bay tree’s  leaves are leathery and stiff with a strong midrib, a lot like me!

And with my second name being ‘Rose’ its a double whammy for a life destined for horticulture! I studied a Bachelor in Applied Animal Technology, where I was drawn to paper selections including Biodiversity Conservation, Ecosystem Management and Biota of Aotearoa. I have more recently completed a Certificate in Horticulture and will be studying Sustainable Management this year.

My favourite place to be is in the bush. My photography hobby has me wandering through the thick native bush, observing the array of fauna. My efforts can be found on my Instagram page lauraflora_nz and in earlier blog posts. We are extremely fortunate to have the Kaitoke bush track at the end of our street, where we will be starting a pest eradicating trap line.

Moving to Raglan I quickly found Karioi Maunga ki te Moana, an organisation whose focus is to restore the biodiversity from the mountain to the sea. I meet with an amazing group of volunteers to build traps and I currently monitor a trap line surrounding the Raglan Area School.

trap trapping pests eradication karioi raglan trapline

Even my art work has been inspired by nature. My beach combing behaviour has me searching for treasures to embed in resin or from textures and colours to replicate in my pieces.

Thankfully my husband is also drawn to earthy elements. ‘Timothy’ also has a meaning of ‘to honor‘. We both strongly value these natural connections which we are passing on to our children.

Whats in a name?

If you have had a child then you will be familiar with the enormous responsibility of choosing a name for that wee individual. The pressure would keep me up at night.

I managed to refrain from looking at name books and from google searches such as “old lady names” until I got that double line of positivity. But as soon as that bun was in the oven I was consumed. I started focusing on the credits of movies.

During one pregnancy I was working as a receptionist at a vet clinic. I would spend time searching client names. Dog names make great little people names. The thing is, naming a baby is one thing, but that name has to last a lift time. What suits a bonnie wee baby boy may not suit a rather large masculine man.

And then there’s ‘namer’s remorse’. I had this bad with our son, Angus. I didn’t regret that we gave him the middle name of ‘Danger’. He will, unfortunately for him, always know that his parents have an odd sense of humor. But I was not happy with ‘Angus’. We loved that our Scottish heritage was evident, and its meaning is “strength”, but I had a bad case of ‘namer’s remorse’. I even looked into what I would have to do to officially change it, but I had no idea what too, so Angus it remained.

On a more recent google search I found that it also means ‘one’, which is fitting as he is my only boy, besides the baby that resulted from my egg donation, but thats their ‘one’, and another post all together. Also appropriate as he was a twin!

As I’d had two previous pregnancies I knew when we were pregnant within the first couple of weeks of gestation. All my pregnancy cues were in full force. I went for bloods, which showed higher results than expected for someone at that gestation. We were sent for an early scan. I think it was about 8 weeks. Sure enough the scan showed two little heart beats. The problem was that one little line was the expected length for 8 weeks and the other 6 weeks. We loved the idea of having twins, but were told of this vanishing twin syndrome and knew it didn’t look promising. While superfetation can coccur in animals, such as rodents, rabbits and horses, it’s not known to occur in humans.

Sure enough by the next scan, 2 weeks later the little line was just a line, without the flickering heart beat. Perhaps the loss of this little spirit is why I didnt feel complete after our third child, and lead me to donate eggs…. which still didnt satisfy my need for another little spirit.

We had our fourth child, Daisy, five years later.

‘Old lady’s name’…… Tick